How to Choose a Plastics Granulator: A Guide Granulation and reduction of size keeps increasing in significance every day. On the other hand, a granulator is used to cut and reduce the size of plastic fragments into smaller granules that are more manageable. The generated granules could then be utilized in other plastic manufacturing or sold in the open market. When shopping for a granulator, you need to choose the right machine to ensure efficient management of the costs of materials, help deliver recycled content, and boost the bottom line. This article looks at important issues on the basis of which the suitability of a granulator for cutting scrap plastics may be assessed:
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When choosing the granulating machine, you want to start with understanding your application. Firstly, define the material in relation to the amount of it you need granulated to size and the bulkiness of the scrap parts. It’s necessary that you determine the physical size and shapes of these parts. Next, turn to the material itself. Different materials don’t have the same reactions; for example PVC and glass filled polymers have different characteristics from polypropylene. And when you’re utilizing a number of feed streams, it is important to assign them percentages. In the event you handle 95% sprues and runners, and purgings occasionally, you’re better off dedicating a solution to sprues and runners while identifying a disparate tool for the purge. When it comes to granulation, you won’t encounter a machine that’s flawlessly all in one, and relying on a single solution for all materials may cause operational inefficiency and extra costs in the long run. Having said that, consideration of all essential elements of your application and materials proves important in the selection of the right rotor type, chamber size, and horsepower capacity needed to deliver superior results. Consideration of Granulator Parts The rotor is one of the most important granulator parts to consider when buying your machine. You may prefer an open rotor for processing fragments with slim walls. The open concept lets materials flow effectively. The best for large, thick scraps is a closed rotor design, while a staggered rotor, which has more cuts for each revolution, is a hybrid of the other two designs. You may also consider the type of engagement between the fly knife and bed knife because it has a relationship with horsepower requirements. Counterbalancing the two knives generates a scissor cut. You could select a machine with two bed knives, or prefer one with three or four for improved cutting action. Similarly, don’t forget chamber size and shape as these have a bearing on the extent of cut the knives can deliver with each action.